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Monday, September 30, 2013

Dear Mayor & Council...




I am writing you in regards to damage that happened to our fencing early in the morning this past Friday, Sept 27, 2013. As you can see in the photos, this individual lost control of his vehicle as they headed south bound, grazed one of our pines,and took out over 50 feet of fencing in the process. 

As is the unfortunate norm, the guilty party left the scene of the accident in a late model Blue Honda (thanks for the parts, Mr. Offender!)  Thankfully, this individual did not lose their life. 
We did call the Milton Police when we noticed it the following day and he was very professional and helpful.

As I have requested since before the city incorporated in 2006, more must be done to address the severe speeding and lack of respect for these open road neighborhood zones. Such residents should have the same opportunity for a safe, quiet, litter free environment as any subdivision resident. 

Within the last ten years on Bethany Road alone, there have been mailboxes and fencing damaged on a regular basis, two fatalities, as well as dangerous speeding and trash daily. Noise pollution is also a constant.

It has been said that leaders lead. It is my hope that this particular email doesn't fall on deaf ears this time around and that the City of Milton GA works with open road residents not only to lower all open road neighborhood speeds to 35 as Alpharetta has, but also works to create an awareness and enforcement campaign that Freemanville, Bethany, Hopewell, Providence, and other open road neighborhoods are residential zones as well. I am confident that working together, we can make a positive impact while saving lives. 

Best, 

Tim Enloe 
770 653 0552

Liberty's Law Petition at 1,096 Supporters & Growing...



By Tim Enloe; Accessmilton.com

Liberty's Law, the proposed ordinance to enhance and enforce laws to protect horses from abuse and harassment, now has over 1,096 signatures on the online petition with support growing daily.

Equestrian groups such as Fortheloveofahorse.org and Savethehorses.org also house a "Liberty's Law"banner and link on their home pages. We are now campaigning to horse farms throughout the state to do the same in addition to more marketing in the near future. 

Liberty's Law is not just about one horse in Milton GA that has suffered ongoing abuse and harassment by local youths. It is about Misty out of Fayetteville GA who was shot four times with a bow and arrow. It is about Rocks and Lucky out of Hall County; both shot by a high powered rifle; leaving Lucky being the only one breathing. Finally, it is about a horse who died on July 6th of this year on Dorris Road in Milton GA after being spooked by fireworks shot from a neighboring property. 

Horses are loving beings that simply want to be left alone. However, cowards throughout the country find some warped since of pleasure by bothering an animal that hold no threat to them at all.

To date, The City of Milton GA, who sports numerous pictures and logos of horses throughout, continues to turn their backs on allowing Liberty's Law to even be presented, much less supported, in a public forum. Why?

Please share the word about Liberty's Law and help us make a difference.

Together, we can protect the beautiful horses from abuse and harassment!

Milton Boy Scout Troop set to host recycling, shredding event.

Courtesy Appen Newspapers

Boy Scout Troop 3000, in partnership with Milton Grows Green, will host a community recycling and shredding day Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Birmingham United Methodist Church, 15570 Birmingham Hwy. in Milton.

Computers, keyboards, non-CRT monitors, appliances, outdoor grills, lawn mowers, scrap metal, cell phones and reusable shoes will be accepted for recycling at no cost. There will be a $10 charge to recycle CRT monitors and a $15 charge to recycle televisions.

The fee to shred documents is $5 per box. Cash and checks will be accepted, and the proceeds will go to benefit Boy Scout Troop 3000.

Paint, hazardous materials, yard waste and non-electronic or metal items will not be accepted at this recycling event. All fluids must be drained from items that will be recycled. For more information, contact Milton Sustainability Coordinator Cindy Eade at (678) 242-2509 or cindy.eade@cityofmiltonga.us.



Read more: Neighbor Newspapers - Milton Boy Scout Troop set to host recycling shredding event

Deerfield Park approved by Milton City Council.

Courtesy Carolyn Aspenson; Appen Newspapers

September 24, 2013

MILTON, Ga. – Construction plans for the new Deerfield Park were unanimously approved by councilmembers at the Sept. 16 council meeting.

"We designed this park with the Deerfield community in mind," Parks and Recreation Director Jim Cregge said. "We realized many of the residents and business professionals in that area would benefit from an exercise-oriented park."

Cregge said the park would have two main focuses.

"We've themed the park, 'freedom to exercise and freedom thanks to our military,'" he said.

The park is located on 1 acre of land at the corner of Deerfield Parkway and Webb Road.

"We'll have a .15 mile path and five exercise stations," Cregge said.

The stations will include equipment for sit ups, body curls, a cardio walker, rowing machine and an elliptical machine.

"We've created an outdoor gymnasium for the citizens of Milton, the very first in the north metro area," Cregge said.

The trail will frame a flag pavilion displaying nine flags.

The flags will represent the state of Georgia, the Army, Marines, Navy, Air Force, Coast Guard, POW/MIA, the United States and the city of Milton.

"We'll have a peace pole in the center of the flag pavilion demonstrating the phrase 'May Peace Prevail on Earth' in multiple languages," Cregge said. "This park will honor the veterans of all of our military services whose combined goal is peace and freedom."

Cregge said the city wants to honor military vets on the scheduled opening, Veterans Day, Nov. 11.

"On that day, we'll offer residents an opportunity to purchase bricks to honor veterans, but we're still determining the structure of that at this time," he said.

Nearly 80 vendors at Crabapple Fest Saturday, Oct. 5.



Did you know nearly 80 artists and antique dealers await festival-goers at Crabapple Fest this Saturday, Oct. 5 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.?

So whether you want American Country home furnishings, antique quilts and linens, folk art, pottery, clothing, jewelry or one-of-a-kind boutique finds – we’ve got it all.
To see a full list of vendors, plus a map detailing where they’ll be set up throughout Crabapple, visit www.crabapplefest.com.

Crabapple Fest will see the City of Milton and non-profit Crabapple Community Association (CCA) combine their two popular events – the 5,000-person Milton Roundup and 10,000-person Crossroads at Crabapple Antique and Arts Festival – into one massive destination festival.
The best from each event will greet the community, including:
  • antiques and art from juried vendors
  • a music and entertainment stage with local and touring acts, plus roaming musicians
  • games, rides and activities for kids
  • for the first time, beer and wine in the festival grounds
Unlike previous years, the expanded Crabapple Fest will sprawl across the crossroads of the historic community. Both Crabapple and Broadwell roads will be shut down, with vendors dotting the usually busy intersections. It means a safer, more immersive experience for everyone.
Parking and attendance, as always, are free. Shuttles will be available all day from Milton High, Northwestern Middle and Crabapple Crossing Elementary schools and Crabapple Baptist Church. Click here for directions to Crabapple Fest, located at 765 Mid Broadwell Road.
To talk about the festival, ask questions or spread the word, use #crabapplefest on Facebook and Twitter.
For any information on the festival, please contact Angela Thompson, special events and projects manager for the City of Milton, at 678-242-2530 or angela.thompson@cityofmiltonga.us.

Reminder: Shredding day Saturday at BUMC.




Don’t forget that tomorrow, Saturday, Sept. 28, Boy Scout Troop 3000 of Birmingham United Methodist Church will hold a Community Recycling and Shredding Day.
This event, a partnership with Milton Grows Green, will be held from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Troop’s meeting place in front of the church, 15570 Birmingham Highway (click here for directions).
Materials accepted AT NO CHARGE:
  • Computers
  • Keyboards
  • Monitors (non-CRT only or there will be a charge)
  • Appliances*
  • Outdoor grills
  • Lawn mowers*
  • Scrap metal
  • Cell phones
  • Reusable shoes
* Fluids must be drained
Materials accepted WITH A CHARGE:
  • $15 for televisions
  • $10 for CRT monitors
  • $5 per box for shredding
Cash and Checks accepted. Proceeds benefit Milton BSA Troop 3000.
Materials NOT ACCEPTED:
  • Paint
  • Hazardous materials
  • Yard waste
  • Non-electronic or metal items
For more information on this event, please contact Milton Sustainability Coordinator Cindy Eade at 678-242-2509 or cindy.eade@cityofmiltonga.us.

Council welcomes Lord Mayor of Westminster.



Courtesy City of Milton

Mayor Joe Lockwood and City Councilmen Matt Kunz and Lance Large welcomed Catherine Longworth, the Right Honourable Lord Mayor of Westminster, to Cambridge High School Sept. 25.

Longworth, who traveled from London, was in town to invite the Cambridge High School Band to perform in the 2014 London New Year’s Day Parade and Festival. Ryan Borger, band director, accepted the offer and gave soccer scarves to Longworth and her fellow travelers.

Longworth also presented Lockwood cufflinks and the students with an invitation and a coat of arms.

Burn ban relaxed Oct. 1.




Milton Fire Marshal Matt Marietta would like to remind the community the state’s “burn ban” will be relaxed Tuesday, Oct. 1.

According to Marietta, from Oct. 1 through April 30, 2014, outdoor burning of small piles of residential debris may be allowed depending on the fire danger rating. 

That rating is dependent on factors such as the wind and humidity levels for the day. You can call the Milton Fire Department at 678-242-2541 during regular business hours to check if safe burning is permitted or refer to the fire safety rating at the Georgia Forestry Commission Web site.

Please note that all fires must be out at dark. Only residents who live in agriculturally zoned areas of the city are permitted to burn (click here for a zoning map).

Additionally, you may refer to commercial weather Web sites to see if a “Red Flag Warning” is posted for the day (often as a weather alert, much like a tornado watch), which will ensure that you will not be able to burn that day.
The following guidelines will be enforced by Milton Fire Department should you choose to burn:
These regulations generally address smaller amounts of natural, hand-piled vegetation to manage:
  • leaf and limb piles
  • grass and shrub clippings
  • vegetative disposal from storm damage
  • weed abatement
  • disease/pest prevention
* Land clearing (whole trees, large branches, etc.) is not included in these regulations and contractors/landowners should contact the fire marshal regarding appropriate burning guidelines for large amounts of debris.
Tools needed for a safe burn include:
  • A rake to create a debris free ring around the fire area 
  • A charged water hose at the fire
  • A shovel
  • Proper clothing (long pants, long sleeves, boots, gloves) and safety glasses
The following regulations apply to outdoor burning:
  • Clear 25 feet or more area around debris pile.
  • Never use flammable liquids to start fire.
  • The resident is responsible for their smoke and embers and is liable for any damages resulting from the burn.
  • Never leave the fire unattended.
  • Ensure fire is completely extinguished and pile is cool to the touch when the burn is done.
  • Cooking fires: Open burning in a reasonable fashion for the purpose of cooking food for immediate human consumption is allowed.
  • Burning under hazardous conditions: The fire marshal may prohibit any open burning when atmospheric conditions or local circumstances make such burning hazardous. Fire crews are designated to stop burns that are deemed unsafe by the company officer.
  • Location of the fire: The location for open burning shall not be less than 50 feet from any structure (house, out-building, fence, public utility, etc.) on larger piles (approximately 3 to 5 feet in diameter), and 25 feet where the pile size is 3 feet or less in diameter and 2 feet or less in height.
  • Recreational fires: Recreational fires shall not be conducted within 25 feet of a structure (house, out-building, fence, public utility, etc.) or combustible material.
  • Remember, smoke and heat from fire rises, so lower-hanging branches and leaves can be considered combustible material and could pose a fire risk as well. Care should be taken to ensure that the flames and heat do not get high enough to damage overhead foliage.
The Fire Marshal reminds residents that they are responsible for smoke and ashes generated by the fire, so keep the pile small and under control. The fire department reserves the right to extinguish any fire that is creating a safety hazard. 
For more information on the state burn ban, click here or contact Marietta at 678-242-2604 or matthew.marietta@cityofmiltonga.us.

Monday, September 23, 2013

Crabapple Fest hits Milton Saturday, Oct. 5.


The changing leaves and temperatures of October in Milton can mean but one thing: It’s time for Crabapple Fest!

Held Saturday, Oct. 5 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. in historic downtown Crabapple, Crabapple Fest will see the City of Milton and non-profit Crabapple Community Association (CCA) combine their two popular events – the 5,000-person Milton Roundup and 10,000-person Crossroads at Crabapple Antique and Arts Festival – into one massive destination festival.
The best from each event will greet the community, including:
  • antiques and art from hundreds of juried vendors
  • a music and entertainment stage with local and touring acts, plus roaming musicians
  • games, rides and activities for kids
  • for the first time, beer and wine in the festival grounds
Unlike previous years, the expanded Crabapple Fest will sprawl across the crossroads of the historic community. Both Crabapple and Broadwell roads will be shut down, with vendors dotting the usually busy intersections. It means a safer, more immersive experience for everyone.
Parking and attendance, as always, are free. Shuttles will be available all day from Milton High, Northwestern Middle and Crabapple Crossing Elementary schools and Crabapple Baptist Church. Click here for directions to Crabapple Fest, located at 765 Mid Broadwell Road.

“We’re excited to bring a full-scale destination festival to the heart of Milton,” said Peyton Jamison, president CCA. “It should be a day to remember and a proud addition to the history of the Crabapple antique festival.”

For full information about Crabapple Fest, including volunteer opportunities, parking maps, food and entertainment offerings and much, much more, visit www.crabapplefest.com. To talk about the festival, ask questions or spread the word, use #crabapplefest on Facebook and Twitter.

For any information on the festival, please contact Angela Thompson, special events and projects manager for the City of Milton, at 678-242-2530 or angela.thompson@cityofmiltonga.us.

Saturday, September 21, 2013

New Poll Up; Old Poll Results

All:

A  new poll is up. It asks "Should roads be widened due to new subdivisions being built?"

Have your say today in the right margin.

Past poll results are shown below=>

New park in Milton will host patriotic ceremonies.

by Nicole Dow; Neighbor Newspapers

September 18, 2013 01:30 PM 

Residents and visitors should be able to enjoy a new park in the city of Milton by the end of the year.

Mayor Joe Lockwood and the City Council unanimously approved an agreement Monday for the construction of a park at Deerfield Parkway and Webb Road.

Jim Cregge, the city’s director of parks and recreation, said the one-acre, triangular-shaped park will serve two main functions: to provide outdoor exercise opportunities and to honor veterans and reflect on the peace military service members have provided.

The park, which is estimated to cost about $160,000, will include a .15-mile wheelchair accessible path. There will be outdoor exercise equipment along the path including a curling board, a sit-up board, a cardio walker, a rowing machine and an elliptical.

The park will also feature a flag plaza where the city will hold its future Memorial Day and Veterans Day ceremonies. There will be nine flags — one for each branch of the military, one for soldiers missing in action or who were prisoners of war, a United States flag, a state of Georgia flag and a city of Milton flag.

Closer to the park’s opening, which is tentatively slated for early December, the parks and recreation department will sell brick pavers which buyers can personalize to honor veterans.

Another feature of the park will be a peace pole, which will be donated by the Alpharetta Rotary Club, Cregge said. The peace pole will have the phrase “may peace prevail on earth” written on it in multiple languages. Peace poles have been erected across the world since 1955 with the movement starting in Japan, he said.

The name for the park has yet to be determined. Right now the project is referred to as Deerfield Park, but Cregge said Veterans Memorial Park or Veterans Memorial Peace Park might be alternative options.

See photos from the NWF certification ceremony.


On Wednesday, Sept. 18, the City of Milton held a National Wildlife Federation (NWF) Community Wildlife Habitat certification ceremony at Friendship Community Park.
The event kicked off with a tour of the Crabapple Crossing Elementary NWF schoolyard habitat before getting down to the award ceremony.

There the NWF project committee gave awards to residents, volunteers, elected officials and city staff who helped make the endeavor a success.
To see photos from the event, click here to visit the City of Milton’s flickr page.

SAR, DAR join Milton Council for Constitution Week



At the Sept. 16 Milton City Council meeting, the Sons of the American Revolution Piedmont Chapter and Daughters of the American Revolution Chestatee River and Martha Stewart Bullock chapters joined councilman Bill Lusk in proclaiming the week of Sept. 17 through 23 as Constitution Week.

Tuesday, Sept. 17 marks the 226th anniversary of the drafting of the Constitution by the Constitutional Convention, and the proclamation asks that all residents of Milton reaffirm the ideals the framers of the constitution had in 1787.
  

Tuesday, September 17, 2013

Troop 3000 holds shredding day Sept. 28 at BUMC.

Time to clean out that home office, because Boy Scout Troop 3000 of Birmingham United Methodist Church will hold a Community Recycling and Shredding Day Saturday, Sept. 28.
This event, a partnership with Milton Grows Green, will be held from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Troop’s meeting place in front of the church, 15570 Birmingham Highway (click here for directions).
Materials accepted AT NO CHARGE:
  • Computers
  • Keyboards
  • Monitors (non-CRT only or there will be a charge)
  • Appliances*
  • Outdoor grills
  • Lawn mowers*
  • Scrap metal
  • Cell phones
  • Reusable shoes
* Fluids must be drained
Materials accepted WITH A CHARGE:
  • $15 for televisions
  • $10 for CRT monitors
  • $5 per box for shredding
Cash and Checks accepted. Proceeds benefit Milton BSA Troop 3000.
Materials NOT ACCEPTED:
  • Paint
  • Hazardous materials
  • Yard waste
  • Non-electronic or metal items
For more information on this event, please contact Milton Sustainability Coordinator Cindy Eade at 678-242-2509 or cindy.eade@cityofmiltonga.us.

Sunday, September 15, 2013

Liberty's Law Clears 1,069 Citizen Signatures Online.


By Tim Enloe; Accessmilton.com

Liberty's Law, the proposed ordinance to enhance and enforce laws to protect horses from abuse and harassment, now has 1,069 signatures on the online petition with support growing daily. Facebook followers continue to grow as well; currently standing at 460. 

Equestrian groups such as Fortheloveofahorse.org and Savethehorses.org also house a "Liberty's Law"banner and link on their home pages. We are now campaigning to horse farms throughout the state to do the same in addition to more marketing in the near future. 

Liberty's Law is not just about one horse in Milton GA that has suffered ongoing abuse and harassment by local youths. It is about Misty out of Fayetteville GA who was shot four times with a bow and arrow. It is about Rocks and Lucky out of Hall County; both shot by a high powered rifle; leaving Lucky being the only one breathing. Finally, it is about a horse who died on July 6th of this year on Dorris Road in Milton GA after being spooked by fireworks shot from a neighboring property. 

Horses are loving beings that simply want to be left alone. However, cowards throughout the country find some warped since of pleasure by bothering an animal that hold no threat to them at all.

It is curious why city council and staff of Milton GA, who carries an image of a horse as it's seal and harbors numerous equestrian related pictures on the city website, continues to remain defiant in allowing Liberty's Law to be even be presented. Only time will tell if this silence is a benefit or a detriment. 

Please share the word about Liberty's Law and help us make a difference.

Together, we can protect the beautiful horses from abuse and harassment!

Milton chief joins effort to end violence against women.

Milton Police Chief Deborah Harrell is one of just 30 law enforcement executives from across the country chosen to attend the 16th National Law Enforcement Leadership Institute on Violence Against Women.

During the four-day Institute in Savannah hosted by The International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) Harrell, along with the other selected participants, will explore innovative approaches for investigating crimes of domestic violence, sexual assault, human trafficking and stalking. She will leave the Institute with strategies to help crime victims and hold perpetrators accountable.

“This is a tremendous opportunity for Milton to benefit from the best methods of prevention and response to crimes against women,” said Harrell. “It is an honor and a privilege to have been chosen to attend.”

Harrell’s cost to attend the Institute is supported by a grant to the IACP from the Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women.

The International Association of Chiefs of Police is the world's oldest and largest non-profit membership organization of police executives, with more than 22,500 members in 108 different countries. IACP's membership consists of the operating chief executives of international, federal, Tribal, state, campus and local agencies of all sizes. Please visit www.theiacp.org for more information.

Wednesday, September 11, 2013

The Magic of Being Weird.

By Bo Quintana; Milton Teen

Milton, I’m not going to beat around the bush here; I’m a weird fellow.
I’ve been called weird many times in my life. I’ve even called myself weird many times in my life.  I like being weird. But I’ve learned that I really have no idea what that word means. Weirdness is something that is strange, but what constitutes strange? Is there a measurement of strangeness? I don’t know. Do I want to know? 

Yes I do!

To the internet we go!

According to Merriam-Webster, the first use of the word weird was before the 12th century. The word was a noun and it meant “soothsayer.” Now unless I’ve been leading some sort of double life in my sleep, like in “Fight Club,” I am not a person who typically enjoys telling fortunes with a crystal ball and a pet snake.
So when did this word stop meaning “witch” and start meaning “slightly eccentric/a bit different?”

Well according to the same Merriam-Webster, it never really did. As of the 15th century, the word “weird” began to mean “of, relating to, or caused by witchcraft or the supernatural.” This is a bit concerning. If I was born in the middle ages, would I be burned like a Salem housewife? Would my weirdness be welcomed with pitchforks and dark cellars?

Well, maybe. But right next to this accusation of ghostly being, there appears a single word, separated by only a semicolon: “magical.”

This definition makes me much happier.  You see, I’d much rather be known as a magic little genie guy than a bringer of all that is bad in the world. But am I really made of magic? I mean, I can definitely picture myself as some sort of Peter Pan, flying around the world, sprinkling magic dust on small children. But am I like that right now? Is that really who I am?

No. Sadly, and maybe contrary to some of your beliefs, I haven’t any small wings on my back. I have checked, holding little mirrors behind my back while looking at larger mirrors, only to realize that not only did I lack any resemblance to a bird or butterfly, but that holding mirrors in that fashion really hurts your arms.
So what other definitions of weird are there? Is there something more modern that describes me perfectly?
Not in my handy-dandy internet version of Merriam-Webster. So let us broaden our word-defining horizons. To the Google we go!

Google defines “weird” very similarly to Merriam Webster, sadly. According to the megalith search engine, weird means “suggesting something supernatural; uncanny.”

I’m not 100 percent sure if this is the most reliable definition, mostly because it’s conveniently placed sentence example is “the weird crying of a seal,” which I’ve honestly never seen as all that supernatural.
However, there is another definition. Weird as a noun means “a person’s destiny,” which makes an interesting point; when all of those third-graders called me weird, did I merely misunderstand them? Were they saying “You’re weird,” or “Your weird,” pointing out my destiny, the future that I owned? Were these little children? Or were they actually prophets, informing me of my purpose and fate?
Is my destiny simply to be strange? Does my purpose in this world include saying words that don’t exist? Doing things thought unnecessary and mentally unnatural?

I do hope so. I’m already pretty much doing that.

So Milton, I leave you with a choice. The first option is to be strange. Be something that other people aren’t. Do things other people don’t. Because I’ve learned that a lot of people get places in life, but don’t have fun doing it. And to me, having fun while doing stuff is the meaning of life.

The other option is to not. And I mean, that’s cool. I won’t judge you for being functional. Maybe to you, being a witch isn’t all that appealing. I can see your point.

Really, I’m not leaving you with a choice. I’m leaving you with yourself. But whatever you do, do it better than other people. Be an awesome person. Do an awesome thing.

Stay magical, Milton.

Yours,


Bo

Milton approves amendments regarding taxicabs.

Courtesy Carolyn Aspenson; The Milton Herald

September 08, 2013

MILTON, Ga. — The city approved an amendment to the Milton code regarding taxicabs. In essence, this would allow taxicabs in the city.

Because there was nothing in the code addressing the issue, the new wording will place any tax company's office in a commercial location, instead of residential.

The council approved the change to the amendment concerning locations of taxi company offices.

"We don't require them to be located in Milton," Councilmember Matt Kunz said. "But if they are, we do require a commercial location, not a residential."
Members of the City Council approved the amendment 6-0. Councilmember Joe Longoria was absent.

Council also voted to approve an ordinance to adopt amendments to the city of Milton charter, with a 6-0 vote.

A resolution for the city to settle a dispute with Fulton County over the Local Option Sales Tax dispute to authorize Mayor Joe Lockwood to execute a certificate of distribution and other purposes was approved 6-0.

Kunz said other cities involved in the dispute would need the resolution also or another solution would need to be determined.

A consideration of a resolution to abandon a portion of public right-of-way on Black Oak Road was approved 6-0.

Road work in Milton moves forward.

By Carolyn Aspenson; The Milton Herald

September 08, 2013
MILTON, Ga. – The city completed the Landrum Road bridge replacement ahead of schedule, opening the road earlier than expected.

Improvements to Cox Road and Ga. 140 are still in progress, but the paving portion will wrap up this week, said Carter Lucas, public works director.

Lucas said improvements to the intersection at Ga. 140 and New Providence have begun and should last about 12 months.

The contractor for improvements to Ga. 372 and Providence Road has also been given approval to start.

Improvements are expected to begin in a week.

"Our paving work continues as planned," Lucas said. "And citizens should be aware of that."

For information on paving and road improvements, visit the city's website at www.cityofmiltonga.us.

Large credits councilmembers for success.

Caroyln Asperson; The Milton Herald

September 08, 2013

MILTON, Ga. — City Councilmember Lance Large won't take any individual credit for his impact on Milton during his time on council, but other councilmembers say otherwise.

He's leaving his post to move to Virginia with his wife, where their primary business is located.

Councilmember Matt Kunz said Large believed in the talents of Milton citizens and wanted to see entrepreneurs be successful. He put in a lot of initial effort and worked with the Milton Business Alliance to start an economic development department within the city and that resulted in the hiring of Bill O'Connor as economic development coordinator.

Large said the council worked together to structure a smart economic development plan for the city.

"Yes, it was important to me, but it's not something I did on my own," Large said. "The city is as successful as it is today because of everyone, and my efforts are just a small portion of a collection of efforts to make Milton such a wonderful place to live."

Large based his campaign on building a strong economic foundation for the city and creating more green space, both of which are part of Milton's current strategy.

"Lance was instrumental in smart business development for Milton along with the infrastructure of the city itself," said Mayor Joe Lockwood.

Lockwood also said Large worked tirelessly to find solutions for creating green space throughout Milton.

Councilmember Bill Lusk, who nicknamed Large "Gramps," said his professional experience as a civil engineer and insight was a great asset to the city.

"He will be missed on both a personal and professional level," Lusk said.

Large leaves his post later this year, but not before the Crabapple Fest scheduled for Oct. 4 and 5.

"This is going to be a great fest," he said.

Large worked hard to expand the festival throughout the Crabapple area and make it more of a family event.

"The joining of the two festivals along with the ability to sell alcohol will make the event something for residents to enjoy for years to come," Large said.

"Living and working for the city of Milton has been a wonderful experience," Large said. "I truly believe, as does my wife, this is the best place to live."

Large offered this bit of advice to Rick Morhig, who will take his seat on council.

"Keep things in perspective, but be firm in your conviction," Large said. "Don't try to be a crusader, and work as a team member."

Large said he believes Morhig will do great work in the community.

"I think Rick would be successful as a councilmember based on his work experience and his love for the city," Large said.

Milton police, fire remember Sept. 11 at local high schools.


Courtesy City of Milton

In honor of Sept. 11, members of Milton’s Police and Fire departments helped with set up of two separate student-led memorials at Milton and Cambridge high schools.

At both schools officers and firefighters helped students and volunteers place 2,977 flags in remembrance of the lives lost during the attacks in 2001.

The public safety professionals then took part in Milton High’s ceremony the morning of Sept. 11.  
To see photos of the set up at Cambridge High and event at Milton High, click here to visit the City of Milton’s flickr page.

Better Together hosts library update Sept. 26.


Courtesy City of Milton

Want to know the latest and greatest about the Milton Library slated to open in Crabapple next year?

Then make sure you’re at the Living Room Conversation hosted by Milton’s Better Together volunteer committee at the Bethwell Community Center Thursday, Sept 26. That’s when Milton City Councilman and President of the Friends of the Milton Library (FOML) Matt Kunz will give residents an update on the library’s progress and a rundown of current volunteer efforts.

The conversation will begin at 7 p.m. Immediately following the meeting, all attendees are invited to stay for dessert and coffee.

The Bethwell Community Center is located at 2695 Hopewell Road in Milton (click here for directions).
If you’re coming, don’t forget to bring books for use in the new library. If you cannot attend but would like to donate books, contact Community Builder Wayne Boston at 678-242-2512 or e-mail wayne.boston@cityofmiltonga.us.

“Everywhere I go the status of the library is a hot topic, so I can’t wait to let residents know the tremendous progress we’ve made recently,” said Kunz. “And bringing books and other materials will get us one step closer to this needed community improvement.”

Kunz said new and gently used books of all subjects – especially textbooks, children’s books, general fiction and coffee table books -- are welcome for donation. Other forms of media, including CDs, DVDs and audio books are also accepted.  

Better Together is a volunteer organization of Milton residents looking for unique and fun ways to connect with neighbors.  If you would like more information on Better Together or any of its activities, please contact Boston at 678-242-2512 or wayne.boston@cityofmiltonga.us.

Milton police, fire to take part in 9/11 ceremonies.


Courtesy City of Milton GA

City of Milton police, fire, staff and elected officials are supporting two student-led Sept. 11 ceremonies at Cambridge and Milton high schools remembering the victims of the heinous attacks on the United States.

“It is our duty to remember the nearly 3,000 lives lost on Sept. 11, 2001,” said Milton police Chief Deborah Harrell. “The local youth taking on these projects are truly special, and deserve to be supported fully.”

Milton Fire Chief Robert Edgar agreed. “We’re proud to take part in these ceremonies,” said Edgar. “That our young people are the ones carrying them out just makes it more special.”

MILTON HIGH

Milton High student Savannah Bailey is organizing the sixth year of Milton’s Sept. 11 display, an honor she inherited from her brother, Zach. Beginning at 4 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 10, Bailey and volunteers will place 2,977 flags on the front lawn of the school – one for each life lost during the attacks.

If you are interested in volunteering to help place flags at the school, contact Bailey at (678) 237-3303 or by e-mail at savvy84@gmail.com.

The next morning at 8 a.m. there will be a short memorial service to commemorate the lives lost in the attacks.

All aspects of the event are open to the public, said Bailey, and residents are invited to reflect on the display throughout the day. 

“I have decided to take over the tradition of preparing the Sept. 11 memorial at Milton High School as a reminder of the great loss our country suffered and as a visual reminder of the lives lost and those who gave their lives to help others,” said Bailey.

CAMBRIDGE HIGH

For the second year in a row, Cambridge High junior Caroline Willis enlisted her fellow students and community members to help organize the school’s 9/11: Never Forget Memorial.


“The goal of the project is to show people that each person who passed away is not just a number,” said Willis. “Every single person had family, friends and people who cared about them.”

Willis and her group will place also 2,977 American flags on the front lawn of Cambridge High School. The community is invited to visit the memorial throughout the day to pay tribute to those who lost their lives and to the men and women who have been fighting for our country, oversees and within the nation ever since. A memorial book will be on site for those who wish to pen their thoughts.

In addition to the flag display, on the morning of Sept. 11 the Cambridge chorus will be singing the National Anthem through the announcements.

For more information about this effort, contact Christina Willis at chswillis@aol.com or 770-815-9295.

Milton named NWF Certified Wildlife Habitat.




After 15 months of hard work from hundreds of community members, on Aug. 27 Milton was officially designated a National Wildlife Federation (NWF) Community Wildlife Habitat.

Milton is just the 72nd community in the country to earn the honor, and just fourth in the state, said Environmental Sustainability Coordinator Cindy Eade, who led the effort with the help of the Milton Community Wildlife Habitat Project Committee, city staff and community volunteers.

"This was a tremendous effort involving numerous residents, business leaders and school officials," said Eade. "But a large share of the credit goes to our many fantastic volunteers - especially to Will Check for getting the project started and Girl Scout Sarah Ellison for seeing us through to the end."

The Community Wildlife Habitat project created multiple habitat areas in backyards, school yards, corporate properties, community gardens, parkland and other spaces, said Eade. Its ultimate goal is creating community where people and wildlife can flourish.

To celebrate the achievement, Milton will host a certification ceremony Sept. 18 at Friendship Community Park, 12785 Birmingham Highway (click here for directions). The event is open to the public and will begin at 6 p.m. with a tour of Crabapple Crossing Elementary NWF schoolyard Habitat, followed by a program at 6:30 in the park.

 Parking is available at the school. 
 For more information, please contact Eade at 678-242-2509 or cindy.eade@cityofmiltonga.us.

ABOUT THE NWF COMMUNITY HABITAT PROGRAM

NWF’s Certified Wildlife Habitat program has been helping people take personal action on behalf of wildlife for more than 40 years. The program engages homeowners, businesses, schools, churches, parks and other institutions that want to make their communities wildlife-friendly.

The Community Wildlife Habitat project is part of NWF’s Certified Wildlife Habitat™ program.  These projects benefit the entire community of plants, wildlife, and people through the creation of sustainable landscapes that require little or no pesticides, fertilizers, and excess watering. These landscapes help keep water and air resources clean. They are healthier for people and the environment, and are less resource-dependent than conventional landscapes. Habitat landscapes can serve to beautify our urban areas and give residents pride in their neighborhoods.
Since 1973, NWF has provided millions of people with the basic guidelines for making their landscapes more wildlife-friendly. There are more than 160,000 certified habitats nationwide.  For more information, please go to: www.nwf.org/community.

Bulky Trash Amnesty Day set for Saturday, Sept. 14 .



Courtesy The City of Milton

The City of Milton Public Works Department and Milton Grows Green are offering residents a bulky trash amnesty day Saturday, Sept. 14, so gather your large items for disposal.
From 8 a.m. to noon, residents of Milton can bring items to the City of Roswell Public Works Division at 1810 Hembree Road in Roswell (click here for directions). Only City of Milton and Roswell residents will be served. Proof of residency will be required, and utility bills are preferred.
Also, bring your gently-worn shoes for a recycling and reuse program to help fund Milton’s Community Wildlife Habitat Project (click here for more information on the project).
Some of the items accepted are (reusable items will be donated to Atlanta Furniture Bank):
  • tires - must be off the rim, automobile tires only; limit 4 per car
  • sofas
  • tables
  • refrigerators
  • chairs
  • washers
  • dryers
  • televisions
  • deactivated cell phones
  • computer equipment and electronics
  • mattresses and box springs
  • grills
  • lawnmowers (with fluids drained)
The following items will not be accepted:
  • paint
  • household hazardous waste
  • any fluids including motor oil and anti-freeze
  • household batteries
  • construction and demolition materials
  • yard waste
For proper disposal of these items, please contact either the Roswell Recycling Center at 770-442-8822 (motor oil and anti-freeze) or Chadwick Landfill at 770-475-9868 (construction and demolition materials).
Materials will only be accepted at the site on the day of the event and only during the hours of 8 a.m. and noon. Please note that the gate will close at noon.
For more information, please contact Milton Sustainability Coordinator Cindy Eade at 678-242-2509 or cindy.eade@cityofmiltonga.us.

Tuesday, September 03, 2013

Liberty's Law Petition Clears the 1,040 Mark.


Misty was shot four times with arrows by a local teen in Fayetteville GA in 2010.

The offender only received 60 days in jail and 300 hours of community service.

By Tim Enloe; Accessmilton.com

Liberty's Law, the proposed ordinance to enhance and enforce laws to protect horses from abuse and harassment, now has over 1,040 signatures on the online petition with support growing daily.

Equestrian groups such as Fortheloveofahorse.org and Savethehorses.org also house a "Liberty's Law"banner and link on their home pages. We are now campaigning to horse farms throughout the state to do the same in addition to more marketing in the near future. 

Liberty's Law is not just about one horse in Milton GA that has suffered ongoing abuse and harassment by local youths. It is about Misty out of Fayetteville GA who was shot four times with a bow and arrow. It is about Rocks and Lucky out of Hall County; both shot by a high powered rifle; leaving Lucky being the only one breathing. Finally, it is about a horse who died on July 6th of this year on Dorris Road in Milton GA after being spooked by fireworks shot from a neighboring property. 

Horses are loving beings that simply want to be left alone. However, cowards throughout the country find some warped since of pleasure by bothering an animal that hold no threat to them at all.

Please share the word about Liberty's Law and help us make a difference.

Together, we can protect the beautiful horses from abuse and harassment!

Bo On High School



Courtesy Bo Quintana; Milton Teen

Let’s talk about that dreaded topic that has been overlooked by the most unbiased reporters, the best presidents and even the worst dictators.

High school.

High school is either the dark ages of your existence or the best four years of your life. There is no middle. It is black or white.

Despite the fact that in the long run nobody cares about those four years, they remain astoundingly and terrifyingly important to teenagers, including myself.

And within the first three weeks of my high-school imprisonment, I have been marked.
Band kid.

Geeky, sci-fi T-shirt kid.

Nerdy, movie kid.

And honestly, I’m okay with these categorizations.

I have seen strange and terrible things, dear readers. Strange and terrible things.
I have seen people paint their entire torsos bright red just for a sporting event.

I have seen people talk about the similarities between Colombians and Greeks -- for an entire ten minutes. Ten whole minutes!

I have been asked by a complete stranger if I own a turtle. On the same day, “someone” turned my friend’s backpack inside out in a strange ritual known to the natives as “turtle-ing.” He, unlike me, owns a turtle.
But that’s not what I would like to talk about here. I would like to discuss the class system.
In our very own local high school, people are dividing each other not by age, but by personality.
You might tell me that I should have expected this. That this is the natural order of this environment. That it is me who needs to change, to fit in.

But I can’t believe this. I know that it is true, but I just can’t believe it. Nonetheless, here are the groups.
The Undesirables: The group of kids that singlehandedly keep the Five Hour Energy company afloat. Their domain is the gas station, where you will often see them with skateboards, using the word “bruhhhhh”.

The Lovelies: Pretty much the Kardashians of high school, in the sense that they are there and they are loved, despite the fact that they don’t seem to do anything or to have ever done anything of importance or interest. They dominate the lunchroom (although they would never eat there because, you know, the food is just so grody) and the mall, where those shoes are just so nice, but also just so expensive.

The Wanderers: Those who don’t really do anything. They’re not a clique, per se. They’re individuals that are just there. You try to make friends with them, and at first it seems like they are just misunderstood little creatures, but when you try to introduce them to a new hobby, or a hobby at all, they instantaneously move to Connecticut.

The Jocks: They Tarzan. Look for Jane. Hockey good.  Pizza also good.

The Goths: Ugh.

Theatre Kids: They seem pretty cool, but then you go to the Black Box or the stage and see pictures of people on the ceilings. You try to convince yourself that that’s normal, that this is a normal activity. But you find more. And you begin to wonder, how do they get up there? Do these people seriously bring in ladders only to tape a picture of a woman onto the ceiling? Is this really what they do?

Band Kids: Although it’s tough for me to find faults with my own group, we are strange, strange people. No other group, for example, voluntarily locks themselves in a tuba case for bragging rights.

Orchestra Kids: Probably the most sophisticated of the Fine Arts kids, Orch Dorks know their stuff. Give them something that isn’t a string instrument, however, and everything and everybody is doomed. When handed a French horn, a member of the Orchestra will mumble something about a lesson they’re late for, dive out of a window, and rock gently in the fetal position in the corner of the school.

Math Nerds/Geeks: They’re good at math, bad at everything else. They will get both far and nowhere in the real world. They will slowly transform into cat ladies, no matter their gender.

Other Nerds/Geeks: They’re pretty bad at math, science, literature, and basically everything except for useless trivia. However, they will eventually become David Letterman. Every single one of them. Clones. The cycle is complete.

Kind, well-adjusted kids with a clue: Nah, just kidding, these don’t exist.

What I think I’m trying to say, dear readers, is that as high schoolers, we all share one thing: We are all, in some way or form, immensely dumb for latching onto a single group. So teach your kids about their common ignorance, and tell them, “Hey kid, cliques are bad. Be stupid together. Make friends with everyone. Also, get good grades because that’s like kind of the reason that you’re doing that whole thing in the first place. So focus on that.”

Stay connected and stuff.


-Bo

Incumbents run unopposed in Milton.

Courtesy Nicole Dow; Neighbor Newspapers

Milton will continue to have the same mayor and councilmembers, with the exception of Councilman Lance Large who is resigning from his post to move out of state.

Former councilman Rick Mohrig, who served on the city's inaugural council, will serve out Large's unexpired term as he was the only candidate to file qualifying paperwork for the District 3 Post 2 position.

Mayor Joe Lockwood and council members Karen Thurman, Bill Lusk and Joe Longoria also are the sole qualifying candidates for their respective posts.

Read more: Neighbor Newspapers - Incumbents run unopposed in Milton

Opportunity zones in Milton could attract more businesses.

Courtesy Nicole Dow; Neighbor Newspapers

As a method to increase business development in Milton, the city’s economic development department is trying to get an area of the city designated by the state as an opportunity zone.

“[An opportunity zone] provides for a $3,500 per job tax credit for a period of five years,” said Bill O’Connor, Milton’s economic development director.

“That is designed to provide an incentive for companies to come into an area and set up shop.”

The Highway 9 and Deerfield Parkway corridor over to Ga. 400 north of Windward Parkway is being considered, he said.

“There are certain areas of the city of Milton that qualify for an application [and] meet certain state criteria … but that doesn’t mean that we would necessarily get any or all of it approved,” O’Connor said.

Criteria include having a poverty level of at least 15 percent or being adjacent to an area with that poverty level, he said. It also needs to be an area that is underutilized and could benefit from redevelopment.

“That’s what the legislation intended to do — to spur redevelopment of certain areas that are underutilized,” O’Connor said.

Consultant Joseph Young will be helping the city identify potential opportunity zones and draft up an application to send to the Georgia Department of Community Affairs and the Georgia Department of Economic Development for consideration.

The application review process could wrap up by the end of the year or early next year, O’Connor said.

He sees an opportunity zone in Milton as a way to compete with other municipalities when it comes to attracting new businesses. He said he envisions attracting commercial office space, call centers, data centers or bio-technology, healthcare or information technology firms.

“There’s a whole host of very ‘clean’ industries that have high paying jobs and would lend itself to a livable community that we’re looking for in that area where we have live, work and play,” O’Connor said. “We don’t think the area would lend itself to large warehouses or distribution centers or smokestack kinds of industries that are better located elsewhere.”



Read more: Neighbor Newspapers - Opportunity zones in Milton could attract more businesses