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Thursday, January 30, 2014

Horse farm event facility approved.

Neighbors divided on issue.

by Jonathan Copsey / The Milton Herald January 27, 2014

MILTON, Ga. – In a unanimous vote, the Milton City Council Jan. 22 approved allowing an event facility on 5 acres of horse farm on Hopewell Road.

The event facility will be restricted to 150 people and will cease "artificial" noises by 10 p.m.

Yellow House Farm owner Jeff Runner came before council to allow him to host special events on his property such as weddings and graduation parties. The events would be held in the buildings currently on the site and the horse farm would remain.

Runner ran into issues from some of his neighbors, notably in the Bethany Oaks neighborhood, in which several homes abut his property. While some neighbors have claimed to enjoy the view of the horse farm, others have expressed concerns about noise and lights coming from the event facility.

Proponents said this was a perfect example of a landowner trying to keep his land, rather than sell to developers.

"There's a huge outcry from the community to preserve as much of our green space as we possibly can," said Councilmember Bill Lusk. "This is an attempt to actively preserve green space in our community."

The venue was first put to council Dec. 2, 2013, and deferred to Dec. 16 for its first presentation. The Jan. 22 meeting was the final approval needed for the property.

One persistent issue with the approval was a holdover from Fulton County's laws. When Milton became a city, it largely assumed Fulton's code of laws. However there was one such law that regarded event facilities in AG-1 (residential or agricultural) districts. That law required the event venue to come back for approval every three years.

Staff said the law may have originated with such county events as the Renaissance Faire.

"At this point, that is the use permit that we have on our books and that is the permit under which Mr. Runner made his application," said Kathleen Field, Milton's community development director.

Neither Field nor the city attorney, Ken Jarrard, said they were aware of similar laws with sunset clauses, and Runner requested it be waived. Council ultimately agreed.

To help address the light issues, Runner suggested using portable barriers that could be moved into place for events and taken down at other times. If the barriers work, he may be able to put up more permanent barriers.

Some residents opposed large plantings and fences along the edges of the land because they said they enjoyed the view given them by the horse farm.

Councilmember Karen Thurman motioned to approve the facility with the addition that Runner and his neighbors would work "in good faith" to come to an agreement about buffers.

"We are trying to put a square peg on round hole, but that doesn't mean the peg doesn't fit in with the city," Thurman said.

Milton's community development director tough, but fair.

by Carolyn Aspenson / The Milton Herald

January 27, 2014 MILTON, Ga. – If you're thinking of breaking a rule or two or maybe even go as far as to violate code regarding community development in Milton, you're in for a big surprise.

And that surprise comes in the shape of Community Development Director Kathleen Field.

"Kathy is a stickler for rules," City Planner Robyn MacDonald said.

Both MacDonald and City Planner Michele McIntosh-Ross said Field is tough, but fair.

"She's got a low tolerance for code violators and rule breakers," McIntosh-Ross said.

"She'll personally call someone who is violating code or breaking a rule and give them a chance to fix things."

MacDonald agrees.

"But if they don't, she'll tell them to go tell it to the judge," MacDonald said.

Field is not only a stickler for rules, she expects – no demands – the best from developers.

"She continually challenges developers to produce a better product and raise the bar," McIntosh-Ross said. "When they come in to talk about their project, she encourages them to add nice features and they do so reluctantly; but then the nicer product sells like hotcakes and they use the design as their new prototype."

Field knows what she's doing and takes her job seriously.

She isn't new to community development.

Originally from Providence, R.I., she received a bachelor's degree from Trinity College in Connecticut and a master's degree in urban and regional planning from George Washington University in Washington, D.C.

"I've been a planner all of my life," she said.

She spent several years as planning director for several communities in both Rhode Island and Massachusetts.

In 2001, Field moved to Georgia. Prior to her employment with Milton in 2011, she was the community development director for both McDonough and Roswell.

Field likes her job with the city.

"I like the vision of growth in Milton, and my skill sets are a perfect match for it," she said.

She is a member of the American Planning Association and is on the Georgia Planning Association Board of Directors.

She serves on the advisory committee for the Drake House in Roswell, a charitable foundation that provides short-term crisis housing, support and empowerment for homeless mothers and their children in North Fulton.

Field is also on the Senior Services North Fulton Board of Directors.

When she's not issuing citations or raising the bar for developers, Field spends her time in the kitchen cooking up gourmet meals.

"I love gourmet cooking," she said.

Don't be surprised if the new communities in Milton soon require gourmet kitchens.

Delay travel, use caution on roads when driving.

Courtesy City of Milton

City of Milton public works staff is urging drivers to delay travel today for rising temperatures to improve road conditions across the city.

With rising temperatures and thousands of pounds of particulate spread, conditions have improved to where major roads are passable. However, use extreme caution on smaller roads, in low areas, on bridges and in shade, as ice still exists.

If you abandoned your car off the road or in a parking lot, city staff now recommends retrieving it.

If you abandoned your car in a road way, it has been towed. If you find your vehicle has been towed, please call United Towing at 770-751-0581.

Officer of the year honored by council.

Courtesy Milton Police Department

Officer of the Year Ara Baronian, center, with daughters, was honored with an official proclamation by City Council at its Jan. 22 meeting.

Baronian was joined by his family, including wife Edie, far right.

A four-year Milton policeman and father of two, Baronian was chosen because of his work in raising more than $24,000 for the purchase of K-9 officer Kyro, plus his expansion of the Rape Aggression Defense (RAD) classes, Milton Police and Citizens Together (MPACT) neighborhood watch program and Citizens Police Academy (CPA).

Last year alone Baronian hosted 24 students in the 10-week academy, added six neighborhoods to MPACT, a 21 percent increase in participation, and taught more than 100 women and girls in six RAD classes.

Thursday, January 23, 2014

Liberty's Law Passes 1,180 Signatures Online / City Still Defiant.

By Tim Enloe; Accessmilton.com

Liberty's Law, the proposed ordinance to protect horses from abuse and harassment, now stands at 1,184 online petition signatures and over 500 facebook friends. With more aggressive marketing in the near future, support will continue to grow.

The goal of Liberty's Law is simple; to protect horses from abuse and harassment via education and enforcement.

Liberty's Law is named after a horse who was born on Bethany road in 1982. In recent years, she has been shot with paint balls,fireworks have been shot at her and above her pastures, she has been screamed at, and engines have been revved to scare her; all by the same offenders. The end result is a horse terrified to graze in the pastures she took her first breaths in.

Even with eyewitness, video, and physical evidence, the City of Milton did nothing to the offenders; not even a warning. One council member refused to support Liberty's Law if her name was in the proposed ordinance while another suggested removing Liberty from the property.

While the City of Milton Georgia's website houses over ten images on it's official website, both council and staff have been defiant in allow Liberty's Law to be presented.

You can support Liberty's Law by signing the petition and encouraging others to do so. Together, we can protect the beautiful horses from abuse and harassment!

Milton attorney fights for animals, people.

Courtesy The Milton Herald

January 20, 2014 MILTON, Ga. — In elementary school, Milton resident and attorney Claudine Wilkins knew she wanted to work with animals.

"As a kid, I couldn't wait to read the newest issue of National Geographic," she said. "I was inspired by Jane Goodall's belief that every life has value and viewed her as my mentor."

At 16, Wilkins got a job as a veterinarian assistant, but said ultimately she was drawn to a career in law.

"I was attracted to the fact that it dictates how we behave in society," she said. "I do what I do because of my love for children and animals."

She admits some of the highlights of her career involved her mentor and her favorite childhood magazine.

"In law school I got to interview Jane Goodall for the school newspaper," she said. "And in June of 1998, I was featured in National Geographic magazine for rescuing a lion cub living in a car."

Now a nationally known expert in animal law, Wilkins found a way to combine her two passions.

In 1996, Wilkins began her law career as a prosecutor and then moved into personal injury law, but a case of animal cruelty forced her to take action.

"When I heard that a man who beat a puppy to death would only receive a fine and a simple ordinance violation, I knew something had to change," she said.

Wilkins was successful in upping the charge to a felony and the man went to jail.

"Equally as important," she said, "the case received a lot of public attention, but I knew more needed to be done."

She said the prosecutor on the case didn't even know there was a felony provision for that kind of crime.

Wilkins created a training package that would teach law professionals how to prosecute animal cruelty and why it should be taken seriously.

"I tried to get my boss at the time to let me conduct the training, but he failed to see its importance," she said.

Wilkins continued to push the issue, which led to a case involving an emaciated Chow Chow covered in mange.

"The dog was in horrible condition," she said. "And I was worried the little girl that lived there might be, too."

Wilkins convinced a special agent to check on the child, who discovered the girl hadn't been in school for four months and was severely malnourished.

"Animal abusers are often linked to abuse cases involving children and the elderly," she said. "So in essence, the dog abuse situation saved the child."

Tired of the pushback from her boss, she quit her job and opened her own firm.

In 2003, the Georgia Bar and Georgia Continuing Legal Education hosted Wilkins' first seminar.

"It was a huge hit," she said. "The chairs were filled with judges, police, animal control officers and members of the local D.A.'s office."

Since then, the attorney has trained more than 2,000 professionals in prosecuting animal cruelty cases as well as authored the manual "How to Prosecute Animal Cruelty from Start to Finish."

But Wilkins' devotion to animals didn't lessen her commitment to people, and she said many of her conferences also focus on domestic violence.

"Research shows that many abusers start abusing a pet in front of the victim to gain control over them, and then the victim stays to protect the animal," she said.

She works with Ahimsa House, the only shelter in Georgia that exclusively takes in the pets of abused victims fleeing domestic violence situations.

In 2004, the attorney gained national attention with a landmark victory in a drunk-driving case in which she represented the families of two teenagers killed by a drunk driver.

"This case marked one of the largest verdicts in the country against a drunk driver and the establishment that served him," she said.

The case received national exposure, but the victory was only symbolic for the teens' families since the money would never be collected.

"I took the case to ensure that more cases like this one could reach a verdict holding accountable both offenders and the establishments that serve them," Wilkins said.

The same year, she initiated, drafted and lobbied an animal cruelty bill that eventually passed in 2006.

"Before that law was revamped and strengthened, Georgia had one of the worst laws in the nation," she said. "Hardly anyone served jail time for animal cruelty."

Since the law passed, Georgia law enforcement has completed about 35 raids resulting in about 54 arrests and saved about 900 animals.

Cindy Wiemann, secretary of the Georgia Animal Control Association who also works for the city of Madison Animal Control, said Wilkins continues to be a valued resource for animal advocates statewide.

"Claudine is not only committed to helping animals, she is always available to assist animal control officers who need a helping hand in seeking justice in animal cruelty cases," she said. "Not every county has a prosecutor that is as knowledgeable with the animal cruelty statutes as Claudine."

Milton needs more innovative ideas to combat density.

Courtesy The Milton Herald

by Abbe Laboda, Preserve Rural Milton

January 20, 2014 While it's important to recognize that the city is in agreement with Preserve Rural Milton's stance that growth and development have gotten out of hand, folks also need to know that the current 30-day moratorium on zoning variances, albeit a positive step forward, accomplishes just a small amount.

It still allows for AG-1 building, which is one home per acre. I'd like to see a 120-day moratorium on variances to allow for additional research in alternative development methods.

It is unrealistic to think that we can stop growth; what is realistic is to think outside the box in terms of how new subdivisions are built so as to preserve wildlife space, green space, specimen trees, historical buildings and a rural viewshed along roadways.

In addition, I think it is important that we as a community change the way we think about our lifestyle and how it pertains to the land. This is a dynamic opportunity for folks wishing they lived on more land to make a move by renovating an existing house or by building smaller in order to achieve their economic goals. More importantly, we need to understand how we can utilize tools like conservation areas and land trusts. One of our goals is identifying ways in which we as a community can preserve the integrity of our properties and our city while maximizing our land values. Our land values have increased not only with the marketplace, but because it's a highly desirable area. It makes sense that as our density increases, the quality of life decreases and so will our land values.

The zoning and policies put in place when we became a city were good at the time, but now have created unintended consequences. One of the components we are actively working on now is revisiting zoning and policy to effectively meet our ultimate goal of preserving as much of the land as possible.

So far, Preserve Rural Milton has received tremendous positive feedback on our efforts, especially in Laura Rencher's quick effectiveness and our inclusive, respectful manner in which we have been working. I think this approach will make it a win-win for everyone.

Senator speaks at business alliance meeting.

Albers explains bills to change future

by Caitlyn Walterswrite the authorJanuary 21, 2014

MILTON, Ga. – State Sen. John Albers gave Milton business owners an overview of a few laws that will change the future of the state and county.

On Jan. 16, Milton Business Alliance members gathered at Atlanta National Golf Club and enjoyed Albers as the keynote speaker for the first meeting of 2014.

"Ever since he has gotten elected, he has done a really good job," said MBA member Jack Shephard. "He's a community-minded person and just a really good guy."

Albers said the state has done extensive work to reduce taxes and regulations in the past few years, but more changes are on the way to uphold Georgia's title as "Capital of the South."

One initiative they have been working on for some time is the systematic elimination of the income tax in Georgia and replacing it with fair sales taxes, just like in Tennessee, Florida and Texas.

"No matter what part of the political spectrum you fall under, every economist will tell you that's the single greatest thing you can do to spur the economy and create more jobs," Albers said.

On the local level, Albers said the state passed 14 major reforms last year to begin the process to radically change Fulton County with a goal of recreating Milton County.

"I promise you that 2014 will be chock full of more Fulton reforms as we make that a better place, because, one day, we will become Milton County," Albers said. "When that happens, we want Fulton County to be in excellent shape."

Albers said there is still a lot of work to do, but Milton County is about three to four years away.

He highlighted initiatives Gov. Nathan Deal discussed in his recent State of the State Address such as education, criminal justice reform and transportation.

The economy and education are dynamically tied, Albers said, and with his education bill, using virtual textbooks is the best option.

"I'm introducing a bill that says before the year 2020, there will be no more textbooks," Albers said. "It's time for us to embrace technology, and it will be a great equalizer for students throughout the state."

Albers said the criminal justice system can be reformed to stop incarcerating non-violent drug offenders and provide a smoother transition into becoming a productive member of society, including help with schooling.

"It's much cheaper to educate than to incarcerate," Albers said.

After the Ga. 400 tolls came down in November, Albers said he was happy to see a promise kept to the public.

Albers also discussed Ava's Law, a bill he is sponsoring that helps children with autism.

"My law will put in both a state and employee health benefit plan where insurance companies have to cover [the autistic] just like they do for mammograms or prostate exams," Albers said.

Albers is also working on bills to protect the elderly and personal information.

The next MBA meeting will be held in February at American Family Care with U.S. Rep. Tom Price as the guest speaker.

For more information, visit www.miltonbusinessalliance.com.

Round and round we go: Milton's roundabouts near completion.

2 finished this year, another on the way

by Jonathan Copsey / The Milton Herald

January 20, 2014

MILTON, Ga. – Anyone driving around the city lately has likely seen plenty of construction going on. Three major projects are in progress, two of which are roundabouts, something entirely new for Milton.

When cities are using federal money, the Georgia Department of Transportation (GDOT) requires the cities to look at using roundabouts. There are a few reasons for this.

"It is essentially [for] safety and operational improvements," said Milton Public Works Director Carter Lucas. "When using federal funds, GDOT requires us to evaluate the potential intersection improvement for a roundabout and to use the roundabout option where they are appropriate."

The biggest improvement roundabouts have is they reduce serious accidents. Instead of a typical intersection in which a car running a red light has the risk of "T-boning" other traffic, which can cause very serious injuries, a roundabout keeps traffic moving slower and in the same direction. It may not cut down on overall accidents, but those accidents are more likely to be fender-benders.

In addition, landscaping or public art can be placed in the center of the roundabout to beautify the intersection.

Lucas said for this year, the city is in right-of-way acquisition for a future roundabout at Hopewell Road and Birmingham Road.

The intersection projects being worked on currently are:

Ga. 140 at New Providence Road

In July, CMES Inc. began intersection improvements at Ga. 140 (Arnold Mill Road) and New Providence Road. Plans include redirecting the intersection approach, adding turn lanes and installing a traffic light.

GDOT awarded the construction contract to CMES Inc. in the amount of $1,161,626. The job is expected to last one year.

Ga. 372 at Providence Road/New Providence Road

In August, Bartow Paving Company Inc. began intersection improvements at Ga. 372 (Birmingham Highway) and Providence and New Providence roads. Plans include redirecting the intersection approach and installing a roundabout.

GDOT awarded the construction contract to Bartow Paving in the amount of $2,576,297. The job is expected to last 18 months.

Hopewell Road at Francis and Cogburn roads

In August, Baldwin Paving Company Inc. began intersection improvements at Hopewell Road at Cogburn and Francis roads. Plans include installing a roundabout.

The city of Milton awarded the construction contract to Baldwin Paving in the amount of $786,606. The job is expected to last one year.

For more information on these projects, the city has set up a special website. Visit www.miltonintersectionprojects.com for information and updates.

Milton Parks and Rec to rent facilities to citizens.

by Caitlyn Walters / The Milton Herald

MILTON, Ga. — The Milton City Council unanimously approved the Parks and Recreation Department's proposal to formally rent facilities to citizens for private functions.

In the Jan. 6 council meeting, Parks and Recreation Director Jim Cregge said the city continues to grow and so have the requests to rent out assets for private functions.

Cregge said the department board worked diligently for about three months to craft a formal policy that combines the wishes of citizens as well as the best practices from five surrounding parks and recreation agencies.

In the agreement, the department will make available a variety of facilities and fields to rent when not in use for city-sponsored programs or city partner programs.

Facilities include, but may not be limited to, picnic pavilions, meeting rooms, gymnasiums and tennis courts. Fields include baseball/softball fields and multiple-purpose rectangular athletic fields. "This is an exciting thing because one of the things people like to see is park programs move forward," Councilmember Matt Kunz said. "I just wanted to congratulate the board and say good job."

Also at the meeting:

The council deferred the consideration of replacing the 150-foot telecommunications tower off Batesville Road with a 195-foot "mono-pine" tower until the Jan. 22 meeting.

This will allow affected communities more time to discuss concerns with the applicant and property owner.

Vandals destroying Birmingham Park.

Land, buildings damaged in parties.

by Jonathan Copsey / The Milton Herald

Vandals entering Birmingham Park have pried planks off this barn to make bonfires. The barn is at least 40 years old. Milton hopes to crack down on people breaking into the park at night.

January 14, 2014

MILTON, Ga. – Birmingham Park, in north Milton, is more than 200 acres of pristine woodland, one of the few remaining large areas of land in the metro area that is largely untouched by development. Horse and bicycle enthusiasts frequently can be seen riding the trails.

"It's beautiful land," said Milton Parks and Recreation Director Jim Cregge. "Lots of people make use of it."

Unfortunately for Cregge, some of those who make use of the park are also destroying it.

In recent years, vandals – most likely teens, Cregge said – are coming at night to have parties where they tear up the ground with their vehicles performing "doughnuts," leave trash around and tear apart the old wooden buildings that are on the land to use for kindling in bonfires.

"The barn is mostly gone," Cregge said. "It's part of the land, and we'd like to keep it."

The park is a dawn-to-dusk park, only open during the day. Residents are not allowed in at night.

The city has few options to control the nuisances. Signs that were erected to discourage vehicles driving on the trails were callously driven over.

"This is right-out vandalism," said Roddy Motes, with the Milton Parks Department. "They are taking vehicles and destroying fields."

Beyond general vandalism, the city has a more pressing concern. The park has many areas that are rocky, uneven and can be difficult – even dangerous – to navigate with a vehicle. But that isn't stopping those who don't know any better.

"People are driving vehicles to areas where they can get stuck and where it's difficult to get a wrecker in," said Motes. "Nobody wants to go on a rescue mission where it's difficult to get to the vehicle."

Motes said that several times, emergency crews have had to go out to rescue a lost or stranded motorist. The city has had to rescue at least four motorists, but Cregge admits there are likely many more that were not reported.

Cregge said his nightmare is someone getting hurt or trapped if their vehicle gets stranded. Given the size of the park, there is a very real chance that, if someone got lost, no one would know where they are if they are trapped.

"Someone could get killed out there," he said.

So far, no one has been reported hurt, but Cregge said it is just a matter of time.

If the problems continue, Cregge and Motes said they are considering stronger methods of containing action, including banning all vehicles in the park.

"We don't want to do that," Cregge said. "Hooves, feet, bicycles. They are all great. There are a lot of great people who respect it and use it for what it is. You can still enjoy the park for its natural beauty. But it's a growing problem of some people damaging the land, trashing it up and putting themselves increasingly at risk.

"We may be forced to take action, and the people who use the park properly will come out losing," he said.

Milton Mayor’s Run presents Jog for a Cause Feb. 22 .

Courtesy City of Milton

The City of Milton is proud to bring the 11th annual Jog for a Cause to the community as part of the 5th annual Milton Mayor's Run. Applications and sponsorship packets for the 2014 Milton Mayor's Run presents Jog for a Cause, to be held at 7:30 a.m. Feb. 22 at Freedom Park, are now available at the City of Milton's Web site,www.cityofmiltonga.us.

To download the participant application, click here.

For the sponsorship application and packet, click here.

To sign up online through Active.com, click here.

"I was thrilled when we were presented with the opportunity to host Jog for a Cause," said Milton Mayor Joe Lockwood. "I can't wait to see everyone out there with us again on Deerfield Parkway, staying fit, having fun and raising money for some great causes."

"As a founding member of the Milton Mayor's Run and a Milton resident, I am thrilled we could partner with the city to host Jog for a Cause," said Dr. Greg Cabrera of North Point Pediatrics. "We have raised over $250,000 in ten years to fight childhood cancer and can't wait to get to work and raise more money in 2014."

The partnership with Jog for a Cause is not the only change for the 2014 Mayor's Run. The race will follow the same route as in years past, but will begin and end at Milton's Freedom Park located at the corner of Deerfield Parkway and Webb Road (click here for directions), said Angela Thompson, Milton's special events and project manager. It includes a 5K race and tot trot. The race will be a Peachtree qualifier.

Cost for participation is $25 if received before Feb. 14 and $30 after. That fee includes a quality, moisture-wicking T-shirt with the logo displayed below and plenty of food and fluids after the race.

Sponsorship levels to benefit The City of Milton Parks and Recreation Department and its efforts to provide citizens with access to greenspaces, parks, trails, facilities, and recreation programs and activities include packages from $250 to $5,000 for title sponsors. Deadline for sponsorship is Feb. 4 to ensure inclusion in all advertising.

The 5K race will circle Deerfield Parkway, meaning it will be flat and fast. Awards will go to the 5K Male and Female Open and Masters and to the top 3 finishers in the various age groups.

For more information, contact Thompson at 678-242-2530 or angela.thompson@cityofmiltonga.us.

Ara Baronian named Officer of the Year.

Courtesy Milton Police Department

Milton Community Outreach Officer Ara Baronian has been named Officer of the Year for 2013.

A four-year Milton policeman and father of two, Baronian was chosen because of his work in raising more than $24,000 for the purchase of K-9 officer Kyro, plus his expansion of the Rape Aggression Defense (RAD) classes, Milton Police and Citizens Together (MPACT) neighborhood watch program and Citizens Police Academy (CPA).

Last year alone Baronian hosted 24 students in the 10-week academy, added six neighborhoods to MPACT, a 21 percent increase in participation, and taught more than 100 women and girls in six RAD classes.

And it’s not stopping in 2013 – Baronian kicked off the new year with two more MPACT neighborhoods and three separate RAD classes for children, beginners and advanced users.

“Officer Baronian has truly embraced his role as the community outreach officer and it shows in this work,” said Capt. Shawn McCarty, who runs the City of Milton Police Department’s Uniform Patrol Division. “His efforts have greatly helped the department overall in providing quality services to the city.”

Baronian transitioned into the community outreach officer position after two years of patrolling Milton on morning watch. He initially got into policing to do meaningful work with children and the community, and the job has given him a great opportunity to meet with parent-teacher organizations, Boy and Girl Scout troops, homeowners’ associations, and more.

“It has been a very rewarding undertaking,” said Baronian. “I get to bring policing to the community, and let them see what it’s like out there on the road -- not to mention how they can keep themselves and each other safe.”

And though he doesn’t do it for the accolades, the typically humble Baronian admitted being named Officer of the Year was a real accomplishment.

“There truly is no greater feeling than being honored by your peers. Something like this, it really makes all the hard work worth it.”

Wednesday, January 15, 2014

Liberty's Law Reaches 1,146 Signatures!


Liberty's Law, a proposed ordiance to protect horses from abuse and harassment, has now reached 1,146 supporters!

Many thanks to those who believe in our cause, but our work is far from over! Please encourage others to talk about and support Liberty's Law. Put Action Behind The Image!

Tim Enloe

http://libertyslaw.blogspot.com

770 653 0552

Milton Residents Want Development To Stop

Courtesty CBSAtlanta.com

CBS Atlanta 46

Petition asks city to preserve Milton.

Laura Rencher launched Preserve Rural Milton, and Jim Bell runs Milton Fields, the only state-regulated green cemetery in Georgia. ALDO NAHED/Staff.

Initiative seeks to influence comprehensive plan.

by Carolyn Aspenson / The Milton Herald

January 14, 2014

MILTON, Ga. — Laura Rencher has lived in Milton for six years and is concerned that the reason she moved here — the rural character — is changing.

Rencher knows change and growth are inevitable, but thinks the city can grow and still keep its rural charm.

"Every morning, I drive down the streets of Milton and am frustrated to see all of the development," Rencher said. "Our green space is quickly being eaten up by rabid developers, and the city hasn't planned proactively to maintain the rural character as stated in the 2030 Comprehensive Plan – and it's time to initiate change."

Milton was named "best quality of life" by several national trade publications last year, which has made the city a popular destination for newcomers. Milton's Growth and Development Report states about 900 homes are under review, under construction or being rezoned.

Rencher said she doesn't seek to put the brakes on growth. Instead, she wants the city to manage growth more responsibly. That's why, in November, she formed a group called Preserve Rural Milton.

A Preserve Rural Milton Initiative petition followed and a Facebook group was formed. It now has about 130 members with a goal of bringing the community together to initiate a change in focus within the city.

"The main concern in Milton has always been to maintain low density, but density has become a distraction to the real issue, which is land conservation," she said.

The Preserve Rural Milton petition asks Milton Mayor Joe Lockwood to hire a consultant specializing in land conservation to create a "green print" of the city.

The green print would provide details on green space throughout Milton and give options for future community development planning focused on land conservation.

Jack Lindon, a board member for Milton Grows Green, thinks the city is headed in the right direction, but has more work to do.

"I would like to see the city develop incentives for developments," Lindon said. "They could be financial incentives or ones similar to those offered in transfer of development rights programs."

Despite resident concerns, Lockwood said the city has stepped up efforts to keep Milton rural.

"As a city, we are working on solutions and incentives to maintain the true character of Milton, options such as conservation subdivisions where more density could be put on part of a development and the rest of the property could be preserved to maintain the rural character of the community," Lockwood said.

He said the December 2013 approval of a 27-home development on Bethany Bend is an example the city's effort to preserve Milton's rural character.

The development was denied twice previously, but approved when the developer accommodated the city's requests to reduce its size.

"We approved the subdivision with an additional 25 feet of buffer space not required by Agricultural-1 (AG-1) regulations, making it a total of 75 feet of space, and also capped the sewer," Councilmember Matt Kunz said. "About half of the land will now be left as undeveloped, natural land."

Rencher said the approval was a compromise.

"In the past, it seems that previous councilmembers felt they couldn't control an influx of high density housing and commercial interests, so they just blocked all of it by stopping any rezoning out of AG-1 and stopping the sewer," Rencher said. "This is a step in the right direction, but it's not a true land conservation subdivision."

Rencher said her group would like to see the city prioritize land conservation above other projects.

"It's not going to be cheap, but there are financing options available and other projects could be put on the backburner," Rencher said.

The city has also imposed a moratorium on new rezoning cases, hoping to pause long enough to change the rules, possibly tightening them.

City Manager Chris Lagerbloom said the city is already looking into ways to conserve land and has applied for consulting and peer assistance related to green space from the International City Management Association.

"If awarded, this will potentially allow us to fit a tremendous amount of research into a short period of time and cause the implementation of short-term items that could benefit the city," Lagerbloom said.

To learn more about the Preserve Rural Milton Initiative, visit www.preserveruralmilton.org. The city of Milton website is www.cityofmiltonga.us.

Milton gets growing pains .

by Jonathan Copsey / The Milton Herald

January 13, 2014

There has been a lot of talk recently about how Milton is changing.

For many residents, Milton was their choice for a home because it was close enough to the city yet far enough away that it still held rural, country charm. Horse farms, forests and creeks are interspersed with quiet neighborhoods.

Through the efforts of the city leaders, Milton has become widely known as one of the best cities in the nation to live and raise a family.

It seems Milton is a victim of its own success, with those farms and forests disappearing to make way for housing developments.

With 900 (or more) homes slated to be built in Milton this year alone, it's no wonder people are concerned about quality of life. This is the housing boom all over again.

There are claims that Milton is being ruined – that developers are running amok. They are snatching up whatever land they can to build as many houses as they can. Developers are accused of preying on poor homeowners and destroying the quiet country life upon which Milton prides itself.

I have a few issues with these thoughts.

There have been frightened, hectic calls against "third-party" interests, as if these people are some shadowy cabal dead-set on ruining the city. These third parties do not exist. They are, in fact, your neighbors – and, potentially, you.

If you and your family sit on 5 acres of land, and you sell to a developer, do you really think they will keep just one house? No. They will try to fit as many homes as they can onto your property. One of Milton's best identifying features is houses sitting on 1 acre. So your 5-acre estate may very well be turned into at least five homes. Possibly more.

If you sell to a developer, you know exactly what is going to happen to your land.

But the city is not deaf to resident concerns. They have already issued a moratorium for new rezoning cases. This will not affect development that does not require rezoning. A strengthening of the land buffer laws – those that determine how close a building can be to the edge of its neighbor – is also envisioned. Steps such as these will surely help slow the tide of new, large development; however they will not stop all development. Nor should they.

There is very little the city can do to mitigate the problem (but be assured, they are doing what they can).

There is the issue of "property rights." That is, a landowner has the right to do with their land what they choose, to a point. They have the right to develop their land just as neighboring land was developed.

Milton cannot simply close its borders to newcomers. Not only is that the wrong thing to do, it is simply impossible. People will go where they want. To paraphrase the classic film "Field of Dreams," if you build new Milton homes, they will come.

A Milton residents gift cards used in Jersey.

Courtesy The Milton Herald

January 13, 2014

MILTON, Ga. – A Milton resident discovered two Walmart gift cards were used by someone in New Jersey, Dec. 31.

The victim told police he received two online gift cards, each for $100, on Dec. 15 as part of a store promotion. He used one of them Dec. 29 to buy a $35 item. Two days later, he checked the balance and found both were completely used at a store in Secaucus, N.J.

Hungry Milton man steals pizza, wings.

Courtesy The Milton Herald

MILTON, Ga. – A man stole pizza he ordered Jan. 3 because "he was hungry and he wanted something hot to eat."

According to police, a pizza delivery driver called 911 after he delivered pizza, wings and cheese dressing to a home on Kentworth Lane. The person who ordered the food, Damon G. McAllister, 33, of Kentworth Lane, Milton, allegedly took the food and refused to pay, arguing he paid for it using a credit card. He shut the door and would not open it again, despite the delivery man's protests.

Police arrived and arrested McAllister for theft. He said he stole the food because he was hungry.

Milton Parks and Rec to rent facilities to citizens.

by Caitlyn Walters / The Milton Herald /January 14, 2014

MILTON, Ga. — The Milton City Council unanimously approved the Parks and Recreation Department's proposal to formally rent facilities to citizens for private functions.

In the Jan. 6 council meeting, Parks and Recreation Director Jim Cregge said the city continues to grow and so have the requests to rent out assets for private functions.

Cregge said the department board worked diligently for about three months to craft a formal policy that combines the wishes of citizens as well as the best practices from five surrounding parks and recreation agencies.

In the agreement, the department will make available a variety of facilities and fields to rent when not in use for city-sponsored programs or city partner programs.

Facilities include, but may not be limited to, picnic pavilions, meeting rooms, gymnasiums and tennis courts. Fields include baseball/softball fields and multiple-purpose rectangular athletic fields.

"This is an exciting thing because one of the things people like to see is park programs move forward," Councilmember Matt Kunz said. "I just wanted to congratulate the board and say good job."

Also at the meeting:

The council deferred the consideration of replacing the 150-foot telecommunications tower off Batesville Road with a 195-foot "mono-pine" tower until the Jan. 22 meeting.

This will allow affected communities more time to discuss concerns with the applicant and property owner.

Milton halts new rezonings.

Will use time to seek rule improvements.

by Jonathan Copsey / The Milton Herald

MILTON, Ga. – In an effort to stem the tide of housing developments, the Milton City Council passed an emergency moratorium on rezoning applications across multiple residential districts in the city.

In a unanimous vote Jan. 6, council chose to bar the acceptance of applications for rezonings to the Community Unit Plan (CUP), Neighborhood Unit Plan (NUP), Transitional Zone (TR) and single-family dwelling (R-2 and R-2A) classifications.

City Attorney Ken Jarrard said the "short-term" moratorium would be for at least 30 days with the possibility of extension. It will not affect developments that are already approved or underway, nor would it affect developments that do not require rezoning.

2014 will see more than 900 additional homes built in Milton.

"In the past few months, we have seen a number of rezoning applications, especially to the CUP zone, because residential developers are looking for ways to decrease the amount of setback restrictions they would traditionally face when building in Milton," said Kathleen Field, community development director for the city of Milton. "By enacting this moratorium, we can look at modifying our current zoning laws to protect the rural viewshed and feel of our community."

The moratorium is just one of many options Milton is exploring to balance the city's sudden housing boom with resident concerns, said Mayor Joe Lockwood.

"The important thing to realize in all this is that we, as a city council, remain committed to protecting our city from unchecked development," said Lockwood. "We're actively taking steps to build a proper balance of property rights and community desires."

"This is the first step we are looking at to deal with the development situation that Milton is faced with now," he said.

Milton city manager credentialed by ICMA

Courtesy City of Milton

Milton City Manager Chris Lagerbloom recently received the Credentialed Manager designation from ICMA, the International City/County Management Association.

Lagerbloom is one of just 1,300 local government management professionals currently credentialed through the ICMA Voluntary Credentialing Program.

“There are just a handful of city managers in Georgia who have earned this important designation, and we’re proud one of them is our city manager,” said Mayor Joe Lockwood. “Every day Chris brings a level of expertise and commitment to the City of Milton that is simply unparalleled.”

Lagerbloom has served the City of Milton as City Manager since his permanent appointment on Feb. 2, 2009. Previously, he held the positions of Director of Public Safety and Interim City Manager. Lagerbloom came to the City of Milton on Nov. 26, 2006.

During his time with the City of Milton, Lagerbloom has overseen a Milton awarded “Best Quality of Life” in the state of Georgia, among numerous other honors for excellence in financial reporting and budgeting, community development and communications.

Additionally, he was the driving force behind the City of Milton bringing more services in house in a hybrid public-private partnership that became the model for Milton’s sister cities looking for ways to cut costs and increase services. Because of the bold move, Milton was able to realize more than $2 million in savings over two years, and continues to operate with an enviable fund balance.

To receive the prestigious ICMA credential, an applicant must have significant experience as a senior management executive in local government; have earned a degree, preferably in public administration or a related field; and demonstrated a commitment to high standards of integrity and to lifelong learning and professional development.

ICMA’s mission is to create excellence in local governance by promoting professional management worldwide and increasing the proficiency of appointed chief administrative officers, assistant administrators, and other employees who serve local governments and regional entities around the world. The organization’s nearly 9,000 members in 27 countries also include educators, students, and other local government employees.

Milton awarded for human resources efforts

Courtesy City of Milton

The City of Milton’s Human Resources Department was recently awarded the Small Agency Achievement Award from Georgia Local Government Personnel Association (GLGPA).

According to the group, Milton won the award for its ability to produce a high level of service.

“In four short years the City of Milton Human Resources Department has developed into a ‘complete’ department,” said GLGPA officials. “With only two employees, the department provides the City of Milton with compensation and benefits, payroll, recruitment and retention, employee relations, safety and risk, and organizational development.”

Department director Sam Trager, who came to Milton in 2009 to shepherd the city from its contract with CH2M HILL OMI to a more traditional model of government, said it was a tremendous honor to be recognized.

“We were given a unique opportunity to be proactive and innovative in our approach to HR,” said Trager. “We’ve been able to build systems that best meet the needs of our employees and able to change and adjust those programs as necessary.”

Fulton to clean sewer system over next six months

Courtesy City of Milton

Over the next six months Milton residents are likely to see Fulton County contractors working on existing sanitary sewer lines to remove grease, debris and roots.

According to Fulton County, residents can expect to see Municipal Services, Inc. and Video Industrial Services, Inc.’s water, vactor and hose trucks and associated trailers, loaders and mixers. None will have Fulton County markings, as they are contractors hired by the county for the work.

However, each crew will carry identification and a Letter of Information and Authorization that states the nature of the work they are doing. It also lists key personnel at their company and the department to contact in case further questions or follow-up are required.

During the process of completing the work, it is possible that a hose, hose nozzle or camera may become trapped in a sewer line and require excavation for removal. While everything possible will be done to avoid these situations, any such instance will require a crew to dig up a line to remove the equipment.

Additionally, some areas of the system require access to the easement be gained via private property. All field crews will act in a professional and respectful way in dealing with any homeowner.

Each crew will carry identification and a copy of a letter addressed to homeowners that explains the work that is being done and all contacts at the department for information and confirmation.

If there is any conflict from a homeowner, the contractor will immediately move on from that location to another targeted location and report all issues to department representatives. That department representative will follow up with all citizen complaints and/or issues that may arise as a result of this work.

If you have any questions, please contact Justyna Grinholc, project manager, at 404-613-8622 and Colin Gowens at 404-612-0638.

The following contractors were chosen by Fulton County for the work:

Root Control Municipal Services, Inc. Mark Reynolds, President

P.O. Box 4743 Queensbury, NY 12804 (Phone) 518-747-2044 (Fax) 518-747-5490

Sewer Cleaning Video Industrial Services, Inc. Drew Mahan, Vice President

7721 2nd Avenue North Birmingham, AL 35206 (Phone) 205-798-0300 (fax) 205-798-6211

Wednesday, January 08, 2014

Parks Director Responds To Equestrian Park Inquiry.

Milton Georgia's New Logo?

By Tim Enloe; Accessmilton.com

Keeping a consistant approach of image without action , Milton Parks Director Jim Cregge answered an Accessmilton.com email recently inquring about plans for a Milton Equestrian Park.

----- Forwarded Message ----- From: Jim Cregge To: Tim Enloe Sent: Thursday, January 2, 2014 9:43 AM Subject: RE: Hello Jim from Tim Enloe / Accessmilton.com

Tim,

Thanks for the email. The Council adopted Parks and Recreation master plan does not indicate the need for an equestrian park in Milton as there is one regionally already existing at Wills Park. If that should change, I will keep your contact information.

Have a good day,

Thank you,

Jim Cregge Director of Parks and Recreation 13000 Deerfield Parkway, Suite 107A Milton, GA 30004 678-242-2489 (O) | 678-242-2499 (F) | 770-843-9966 (C) www.cityofmiltonga.us

A couple of questions to consider:

A. Didn't we incorporate so we wouldn't have to rely on the City of Alpharetta? B. Are we not the City that plasters pitures of horses all over city based media and talks about "rural character" every other word?

Mr. Cregge is not at fault here. He can only work with the tools given to him by council and staff.

Not one current or past elected official has been an active advocate for promoting the equestrian lifestyle. They have turned down the opportunity to become a leader within the Equestrian Community by supporting Liberty's Law which would protect horses from abuse, they did not put legislation in place in 2006 to encourage farms to remain, and the lie continues to this day. Residents even had to ask staff to post a notice new years eve about the dangers of fireworks near horses after they failed to place a notice earlier in the week even after a horse died this past July 4th due to being spooked by fireworks.

"Milton Georgia-Image Without Action."

Milton passes emergency moratorium on rezonings.

Courtesy City of Milton

Milton passes emergency moratorium on rezonings

Milton’s elected officials last night passed an emergency moratorium on rezoning applications across multiple residential districts in the city in an effort to stem the tide of housing developments seeking less restrictive regulation.

In a unanimous vote, City Council chose to bar the acceptance of applications for rezonings to the Community Unit Plan (CUP), Neighborhood Unit Plan (NUP), Transitional Zone (TR), and single-family dwelling (R-2 and R-2A) classifications.

“In the past few months we have seen a number of rezoning applications, especially to the CUP zone, because residential developers are looking for ways to decrease the amount of setback restrictions they would traditionally face when building in Milton,” said Kathy Field, community development director for the City of Milton. “By enacting this moratorium we can look at modifying our current zoning laws to protect the rural viewshed and feel of our community.”

Mayor Joe Lockwood said the moratorium is just one of many options Milton is exploring to balance the city’s sudden housing boom with resident concerns their bucolic city might be slipping away.

“The important thing to realize in all this is that we, as a city council, remain committed to protecting our city from unchecked development,” said Lockwood. “Instead, we’re actively taking steps to build a proper balance of property rights and community desires.”

To learn more about the moratorium and Milton’s other smart growth strategies like form-based coding, transfer of development rights and community-based master planning, visit the Community Development Department’s Web site.

To learn more about rezoning cases currently in the regulatory process, click here.

Update about 'The citizens of Milton, Georgia request a Preserve Rural Milton Initiative to save the unique rural character of our city.'

You are invited to attend a presentation by Carol Hassell, the director of the Georgia Piedmont Land Trust on January 12 at 2 pm.

The meeting will be help at the restaurant adjacent to I love NY Pizza at Birmingham Crossroads.

Carol Hassell is the current director of the Georgia Piedmont Land Trust and was on the city council in Sewanee in the early 2000's, when the city was developing its open space initiative. This plan instituted a $17.7 million Open Space Bond Program. The city now has outstanding greenways and greenspace program. The population, sq. mile area, and SES are significantly lower than Milton's. Therefore, we believe Milton could create a comprehensive plan to focus on preserving rural Milton and raise much greater amounts of funds. As Director of the Georgia Piedmont Land Trust, Ms. Hassell also specializes in private land conservation through trusts. She will be sharing her wealth of knowledge on urban land conservation through both public and private strategies.

This is part of a series of educational presentations that we are sponsoring to promote strategies to address the preservation of rural character in Milton.

This message was sent by Preserve Rural Milton using the Change.org system. You received this email because you signed a petition started by Preserve Rural Milton on Change.org: "The citizens of Milton, Georgia request a Preserve Rural Milton Initiative to save the unique rural character of our city.." Change.org does not endorse contents of this message.

View the petition

Evergreen schools meeting Jan. 14.

Get a jump start on your Earth Day curriculum and ideas for making Earth Day special for your students by attending our Evergreen meeting on Tuesday, Jan. 14 from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. at High Meadows School in Roswell.

Michelle Griffin, a teacher at High Meadows and former Roswell Environmental Educator winner, will be sharing some exciting ideas. Refreshments are provided by Harry's Farmers Market.

High Meadows is located at 1055 Willeo Road in Roswell (click here for directions). For more information please RSVP on the Meetup group or contact Cindy Eade at cindy.eade@cityofmiltonga.us.

Katie Reeves hosts meeting at Summit Hill Jan. 21.

Courtesy City of Milton

Fulton County School Board Member Katie Reeves will host her monthly Community Meeting on Tuesday, Jan. 21 at 9:30 a.m. The meeting will be held at Summit Hill Elementary School, 13855 Providence Road (click here for directions).

Children's Charities hosts ICEFEST 2014.

Children's Charities, a Milton based non-profit, will host ICEFEST 2014 Ice Carving Festival Saturday, Jan. 25 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. to benefit the Early Autism Detection Unit for Children's Healthcare of Atlanta.

This event will take place at the Chattahoochee Nature Center, 9135 Willeo Road in Roswell (click here for more information).

Ticket packages range from $10 to $45. Day pass includes access to the Center from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. with the Atlanta Ice Marvels sculptors, food truck alley from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., an ice sculpting competition, a magician and inflatables, a bonfire with s'mores and a live onsite broadcast from B98.5.

The reception and reveal from 6 to 10 p.m. is hosted by Jamie Bendall of the Punchline and includes a heated cocktail lounge, reveal of the 12-foot ice sculpture, lighting of the 10-foot ice torch, live music from the Stephen Lee Band, Farm fresh food by Harry's Farmers Market will be crafted by Chef Derek Dollar of Milton's Cuisine and Cocktails.

For sponsorship opportunities, visit www.childrenscharitiesga.org or call 404-217-4643. Purchase tickets by phone at 877-725-8849 or online at www.ticketalternative.com. Search: ICE FEST.

Evergreen grants program deadline Jan. 31.

Both public and private schools in Milton that are current Evergreen School partners are eligible for the city's Environmental Grant Program.

Grants of up to $500 will be awarded for projects that involve a large number of students in education projects related to water quality/conservation and waste reduction.

Grants are due by Jan. 31 to be used for projects implemented by Sept. 30, 2014. To download the application, click here.

For more information, please contact Cindy Eade at cindy.eade@cityofmiltonga.us.

Household paint and chemical collection Feb. 22.

Courtesy City of Milton

Milton's second Household Paint and Chemical Collection event is scheduled for Feb. 22 at Bell Memorial Park, 15245 Bell Park Road (click here for directions).

This will be an opportunity to get rid of old paint and household chemicals at no charge. Pre-registration is required. Stay tuned for more details in February!

For more information, please contact Cindy Eade at cindy.eade@cityofmiltonga.us.

Better Together: A look back at 2013.

Better Together, a volunteer committee of Milton-area residents, had a successful 2013.

In keeping with its primary goal of identifying ways in which to make Milton a more welcoming community for all, committee members participated in a number of activities and projects during the year.

These included supporting North Fulton Community Charities and the new Milton Senior Center, hosting quarterly meetings open to the public (such as the conversation with state House Speaker Pro Tem Jan Jones) and participating in Earth Day, Rivers Alive and Adopt-a-Road.

In addition, the volunteer committee also continues to work closely with Milton-area high school students by supporting the work of Communiteen. Communiteen encourages and fosters friendships among teens of all abilities.

Better Together committee members range in age from high school students to senior adults. All interested citizens are welcome to attend the twice-monthly meetings which are normally held at the Bethwell Community Center, 2695 Hopewell Road (click here for directions). Meetings are typically held every other Monday evening from 6 to 7 p.m.

If you would like more information on Better Together or any of its activities, please contact Community Builder Wayne Boston at 678-242-2512 or wayne.boston@cityofmiltonga.us.

Citizens Government Academy.

Citizens Government Academy 9

The City of Milton Communications Department has undertaken a monthly, video-on-demand Citizens Government Academy hosted through the city's YouTube page.

Each month, Communications Manager Jason Wright will discuss a new topic in the two-minute videos.

Soon, installments will cover virtually every aspect of the city's municipal operations, including sections reserved for hot topics that arise throughout the project.

To visit the City of Milton's YouTube page, click here.

For more information, contact Communications Manager Jason Wright at jason.wright@cityofmiltonga.us or 678-242-2523.

Roadwork continues in Milton.

Roadwork projects continue throughout the city in January.

ROADWORK

Please note: All dates on roadwork projects are estimates and are based on weather conditions. Any road closures will be sporadic and announced well in advance.

Ga. 140 at New Providence Road

In July, CMES, Inc. began intersection improvements at Ga. 140 (Arnold Mill Road) and New Providence Road. Plans include redirecting the intersection approach, adding turn lanes and installing a traffic light.

The Georgia Department of Transportation (GDOT) awarded the construction contract to CMES, Inc. in the amount of $1,161,626.92. The job is expected to last one year.

Ga. 372 at Providence Road/New Providence Road In August, Bartow Paving Company, Inc. began intersection improvements at Ga. 372 (Birmingham Highway) and Providence and New Providence Roads. Plans include redirecting the intersection approach and installing a roundabout.

GDOT awarded the construction contract to Bartow Paving Company, Inc. in the amount of $2,576,297.45. The job is expected to last 18 months.

Hopewell Road at Francis and Cogburn roads

In August, Baldwin Paving Company, Inc. also began intersection improvements at Hopewell Road at Cogburn and Francis roads. Plans include installing a roundabout.

The City of Milton awarded the construction contract to Baldwin Paving Company, Inc. in the amount of $786,606. The job is expected to last one year.

For more information on these projects, visit http://miltonintersectionprojects.com or contact Angie Kapijimpanga, citizen responder for the City of Milton, at 678-242-2562 or angie.kapijimpanga@cityofmiltonga.us.

Monthly new business report.

This list is compiled from business license records kept by the city's Community Development Department. If a new business receives a license within the month proceeding the newsletter, it will be listed.

The appearance of a business on this page is not intended, nor should it be construed, as the City of Milton's or Milton City Council's endorsement, sanction, promotion or advertisement of any particular business. Identification of businesses on this list is for informational purposes only. Citizens interested in retaining or conducting business with any of the companies or agencies listed in this item should conduct their own review and investigation of that business.

First Alliance Realty Group, Inc.: 153 Tullgean Drive

Masquerade Exotic Animals: 14325 Hopewell Road

Taziki's Atlanta, LLC: 5306-B Windward Parkway

Plumbing Central: 215 Six Hills Lane

AskCody, Inc.: 13010 Morris Road Sixth Floor Building Four

Optimum Vitality, LLC: 445 Burgess Trail

Nothing Bundt Cakes: 5230 Windward Parkway

Fujian, Inc.: 5316 Windward Parkway For a continually updated list of current businesses in Milton via the city's Web site, click here.